Tags: sleep apnea

Sleep Apnea disqualifies you from being a bone marrow donor?

Somebody pointed out that having Sleep Apnea disqualifies you from joining/staying in the National Bone Marrow Registry.

Even though they say 80% of marrow donations are done using an apheresis (think plasma or platelet donations)....

The explanation is:

Patient and donor safety is our top priority. Donor guidelines are developed by our Donor and Patient Safety Monitoring Committee. The committee is made up of medical directors from NMDP donor, transplant, apheresis and collection centers, a donor and a patient.

The primary risk associated with sleep apnea is related to marrow collection, which is a surgical procedure. Registry members must be able to donate either marrow or peripheral blood stem cells, depending on the needs of the patient.

Regulating anesthesia is more difficult in patients with breathing. After surgery, marrow donors may require narcotic pain medication, which can further depress breathing. In patients with sleep apnea, even a small amount of anesthetic sedation can cause decreased airflow.

Despite the risk, some registry members express their willingness to assume the risk in order to help a patient. While the NMDP appreciates the courage and compassion that motivates them, it would be unethical for the NMDP to allow donors to do so.

To learn about other way to help patients and their families, visit http://www.marrow.org/HELP/index.html?src=tabinvolved

Of course, the explanation then raises the question of other disorders, such as narcolepsy and/or idiopathic hypersomnia....who also can respond differently to anesthetic or pain meds.

Regarding your questions about narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia disqualifying a donor, it would best be considered on a case-by-case basis to determine the extent to which it affected breathing, and what impact it might have on the ability to donate.

So, there you have it...if you have sleep apnea, they tell you to go away... But, if you have some other condition of similar or greater risk...they'll let you in....because not waking up from anesthetic is okay if you keep breathing? Though one also wonders if they fully understand what sleep apnea can be?

I have seasonal allergies

I've known that ever since I moved to the US/midwest. Though I don't know if I would see myself moving back to Canada/southern Alberta in the near future....

But, I have always been curious as to just what I'm allergic to. Though I've never had an allergy test, the doc just prescribed some stuff...Zyrtec and Rhinocort. And, that made things tolerable.

Though Rhinocort was expensive, tier 3...high copay. So, I wasn't refilling it as often as I should. And, I was getting my Zyrtec from Canada....since it was available OTC & generic (Cetirizine) long before it was the case in the US.

Healthcare costs might be a compelling reason to move back some day. :hmm:

Then I was out of work, and then new job has different insurance (and co-insurance instead of co-pay)....plus allergies seemed different here than there. But, I stayed with Zyrtec...but hadn't pursued getting a new prescription. Plus Zyrtec is now available OTC and generic...and isn't covered by insurance anymore. Insurance won't pay for other allergy choices either....consider it a lifestyle medication.

I did Flonase for a while here there...and the newer brand version from the same company (forget the name, just recall that it was tier 3...so high co-insurance)...though more because of my breathing/OSA issues.

Anyways....now I'm seeing a specialist for sleep stuff....and he had me do an allergy test. Was surprised that it was just a blood test.

Later I got a phone call, saying yes I'm allergic to a bunch of seasonal things....take Zyrtec and Singulair.

Though I didn't get a summary letter, since I was curious as just what exactly.... So, toady I asked for a copy of the results.

For "Allergens, Zone 11": I'm allergic to Kentucky Bluegrass, Johnson Grass, Alternaria tenuis, White Oak, and Wormwood/Sagebrush.

Yay? |-|

What is Sleep Apnea?

What Is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They often occur 5 to 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep 3 or more nights each week. You often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep when your breathing pauses or becomes shallow.

This results in poor sleep quality that makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea is one of the leading causes of excessive daytime sleepiness.

Overview

Sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed. Doctors usually can't detect the condition during routine office visits. Also, there are no blood tests for the condition.

Most people who have sleep apnea don't know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member and/or bed partner may first notice the signs of sleep apnea.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This most often means that the airway has collapsed or is blocked during sleep. The blockage may cause shallow breathing or breathing pauses.

When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage can cause loud snoring. Obstructive sleep apnea happens more often in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone.

Central sleep apnea is a less common type of sleep apnea. It happens when the area of your brain that controls your breathing doesn't send the correct signals to your breathing muscles. You make no effort to breathe for brief periods.

Central sleep apnea often occurs with obstructive sleep apnea, but it can occur alone. Snoring doesn't typically happen with central sleep apnea.

Outlook

Untreated sleep apnea can:

  • Increase the risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, obesity, and diabetes
  • Increase the risk for or worsen heart failure
  • Make irregular heartbeats more likely
  • Increase the chance of having work-related or driving accidents

Lifestyle changes, mouthpieces, surgery, and/or breathing devices can successfully treat sleep apnea in many people.

Sleep Cycle on my iPhone

Last weekend, while checking my usual daily websites....I came across mention of a gadget on gdgt called WakeMate. I have been toying with the idea of getting one of these gadgets for years, decades? Definitely well before I learned of my sleep disorders and started the therapy for them.

Now I still have other problems and eventually hope to start some kind of treatment for those. Soon I'll be done with the joys of taking iron pills for the 'anemia'.

So, while googling around trying to learn about WakeMate, I came across a review of Sleep Cycle. An iPhone app that also works by monitoring your sleep and trying figure out the optimal point in a window before your planned wake time to wake you.

Give that it was only 99cents, I decided I didn't have anything to lose by trying it. Though it was kind of inconvenient that it was Sunday when I found it. But, I decided to start using it right away....seemed safe enough to try.

Here's the sleep graph for my first night:

SleepGraphFeb22

The window the app does is 30 minutes, and this first night it woke me 30 minutes before my normal alarm. And, I certainly wasn't feeling it, so I ignored it and went back to sleep....ended up sleeping through to my normal 3rd alarm.

The 3 alarm sequence is radio alarm, which is followed with a beeper alarm, which is then followed by a light coming on....a 55W CFL 5000K lamp.

I continued to use the app...and by the 5th night (Friday morning) I woke a few minutes before my alarm, found a sleep graph of this:

SleepGraphFeb26

and was able to get out of bed. Had to hang around the bedroom to shush the alarm....but managed to get my morning things done and out the door at a good time.

I continued to run it over the weekend....

Friday Night/Saturday Morning:

SleepGraphFeb27

Saturday Night/Sunday Morning:

SleepGraphFeb28

Woke up good on Saturday and managed to do all the errands I wanted to get done....first going to Aggieville and then later going the other way to Westloop.

Sunday morning was also good, but then the lazy kicked in and I ended up not going out to do the other errands in the Westloop area. So, thinking I might hit Campus Food or something again. &#59;D

I wonder if I should ask about getting another Sleep Study and see what kind of sleep structure I'm having now. There's a Zeo product that get into sleep structure....though the forehead attachment for its sensors is a problem, since my CPAP mask covers my forehead. But, the Sleep Cycle app does show that it does take me a while to fall asleep now and the waking during the night...which sometimes takes forever to get back to sleep again. Could be much worse looking if I weren't taking a sleep aid....

Hopefully doing something about the next thing wrong with me will finally do it.

Do I really have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

And, if so....how long have I been suffering?

This latest step in my life started 2 months and 1 day ago. I was having my annual physical the day before I turned the Big 40. I don't recall exactly what led to it, but somewhere during the physical the doctor started asking me questions about my sleep, and coffee consumption (which is down from last year)....though I occasionally resort to other caffeine sources in the afternoon.

The end result, other than the usual blood test (minus cholesterol check, because I had already had one recently since I'm being actively treated for high cholesterol....though I'd be curious what my total cholesterol is...or what my good cholesterol is.) He wanted me to get an Echo-cardiogram, because my heart murmur seems to have gotten more pronounced....though it could just be amplification due to my chest becoming more sunken. And, a sleep study.

The echo-cardiogram was fine.

Meanwhile, I had the sleep study on December 1st. It was a split study, and I know I did doze off during the first part...because I was having my usual, semi-conscious dream... It was starting to get disturbing...when I was woken up to have the CPAP applied, etc.

I don't know when I slept during the second part of things, because when I was woken the next morning...there had been an indeterminate passage of time and no dreams that I could recall.

Pages: 1· 2