Sleep Diary Spreadsheet

With an impending PSG/MSLT (December 2nd, 2010), and a particularly disrupted night's sleep recently...I got to thinking that I would start my sleep diary now. Rather than wait until the requested 2 weeks before the PSG/MSLT.

Of course, the sleep lab provided a sleep diary on a printed sheet to fill out. Which means either I fill it from memory now and then, or carry it wherever I go. If only there were some way to, say, use a computer.... :hmm:

I did a quick google search, and all I could find were PDF files. Surely somebody else has thought of this? :?:

So, looking at the provided sleep diary sheet from the sleep lab, I sat down and created a sleep diary spreadsheet using OpenOffice....using my laptop (Ubuntu 10.04LTS) [which when at home is on futon in front of TV, but I'll be at Chicago TARDIS the weekend before the PSG/MSLT]

:!: SleepDiary.ods :!: BlankSleepDiary.ods :!:

I opted to leave it in the default format, so that I won't have to deal with OpenOffice asking if I'm sure that I want to not use OpenDocument format.

I then saved the file into my Dropbox folder and created a link from my desktop to it. I can now update my sleep diary wherever I might be.

Such as living room computer (Windows XP Professional - OpenOffice), or computer next to bedroom (Ubuntu 10.04LTS 64-bit Server), or computer at work (Windows 7 Professional - LibreOffice).

Liking the result so much, I've decided that I should share it. &#59;D

Full story »

What is an MSLT?

An MSLT, Multiple Sleep Latency Test, is a nap study. It is used to see how quickly you fall asleep in quiet situations during the day.

The study is based on the idea that you should fall asleep in a shorter amount of time as your feeling of sleepiness increases. The MSLT charts your brain waves, heartbeat, records your eye and chin movements. The study also measures how quickly and how often you enter the rapid-eye-movement (REM) stage of sleep. Results of the nap study are routinely used to detect sleep disorders.

The study isolates you from outside factors that can affect your ability to fall asleep. These factors include such things as the following:

  • Temperature (too hot or too cold)
  • Light
  • Noise
  • Activity

Other factors that can still affect the results of the study include the following:

  • Anxiety
  • Tension
  • Depression
  • Age
  • Caffeine
  • Drugs and medications
  • Amount of sleep prior to the study

The use of stimulants needs to be stopped for two weeks before the MSLT. Your sleep specialist should help you properly schedule the use of any other medications.

An MSLT is used to evaluate people who are thought to have narcolepsy. Most people with narcolepsy fall asleep in average of less than fire minutes during the test. Some take longer than five minutes to fall asleep. There are also people without narcolepsy who fall asleep in less than five minutes. The test also counts sleep-onset REM periods (SOREMPS). This is having REM sleep very soon after you fall asleep. REM sleep is normally the fifth and last stage of each sleep cycle. Having two or more SOREMPS in an MSLT is usually the indicator of narcolepsy.

An MSLT may be used to see if a person has idiopathic hypersomnia. These patients will fall asleep easily but do not have SOREMPS.

An MSLT will reveal a broad range of time in which it takes normal sleepers to fall asleep. Normal sleepers usually fall asleep in an average of about ten minutes during the five naps of the MSLT. Due to the wide range of normal times, the results alone are not enough to diagnose a sleep disorder. Doctors must also consider other data, tests, and medical information.

Sleep Disorder Support Group at K-State?

Link: http://www.kstatecollegian.com/news/student-learns-to-juggle-disability-college-life-1.2210101

At some point after my diagnosis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and my continuing problems that seemly too perfect CPAP compliance didn't solve, I wondered about the existence of a support group in town.

Eventually I found the AWAKE group, but that doesn't meet very often or regularly.

Then I started to wonder if there was or could be a support group at Kansas State University...not sure if that was before the word Narcolepsy was raised with me....

But, then the article linked above ran in the K-State Collegian...and in the comments to the article was the thought of a sleep disorder support group for K-State. So, I decided to send Megan Reynolds an email about the possible formation of such....along with a bit of my plight :)

The idea got tossed around, we talked about meeting, but neither happened before the end of the semester. And, I wasn't sure about bring it back up in the fall. But, things happened. I've been meeting people online, learning more and more about the subject, and then I was contacted via the NRG side of this site about whether there is a sleep disorder support group in the area. And, then that prompted me to bring it up again.

During the early exchange, Megan had said that she wanted to meet me....but I'm shy, so I avoided that part &#59;) But, yesterday I get a call...she's looking for me. And, I went ahead and said where my office is (co-workers commented that I shouldn't have done that :p ) But, we finally met. At least I'm pretty sure we did.

So, I finally made the trip over to Disability Support Services to make my interest known, and maybe further the possibility of the group happening. Perhaps something will come to be later this fall. Fingers crossed.

Not sure what the time frame is for me finding out why I still have most of the symptoms I had before CPAP, along with a bunch that I had forgotten that I had. That the seeming perfect resuls of being on CPAP....

I have seasonal allergies

I've known that ever since I moved to the US/midwest. Though I don't know if I would see myself moving back to Canada/southern Alberta in the near future....

But, I have always been curious as to just what I'm allergic to. Though I've never had an allergy test, the doc just prescribed some stuff...Zyrtec and Rhinocort. And, that made things tolerable.

Though Rhinocort was expensive, tier 3...high copay. So, I wasn't refilling it as often as I should. And, I was getting my Zyrtec from Canada....since it was available OTC & generic (Cetirizine) long before it was the case in the US.

Healthcare costs might be a compelling reason to move back some day. :hmm:

Then I was out of work, and then new job has different insurance (and co-insurance instead of co-pay)....plus allergies seemed different here than there. But, I stayed with Zyrtec...but hadn't pursued getting a new prescription. Plus Zyrtec is now available OTC and generic...and isn't covered by insurance anymore. Insurance won't pay for other allergy choices either....consider it a lifestyle medication.

I did Flonase for a while here there...and the newer brand version from the same company (forget the name, just recall that it was tier 3...so high co-insurance)...though more because of my breathing/OSA issues.

Anyways....now I'm seeing a specialist for sleep stuff....and he had me do an allergy test. Was surprised that it was just a blood test.

Later I got a phone call, saying yes I'm allergic to a bunch of seasonal things....take Zyrtec and Singulair.

Though I didn't get a summary letter, since I was curious as just what exactly.... So, toady I asked for a copy of the results.

For "Allergens, Zone 11": I'm allergic to Kentucky Bluegrass, Johnson Grass, Alternaria tenuis, White Oak, and Wormwood/Sagebrush.

Yay? |-|

What is Sleep Apnea?

What Is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They often occur 5 to 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep 3 or more nights each week. You often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep when your breathing pauses or becomes shallow.

This results in poor sleep quality that makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea is one of the leading causes of excessive daytime sleepiness.

Overview

Sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed. Doctors usually can't detect the condition during routine office visits. Also, there are no blood tests for the condition.

Most people who have sleep apnea don't know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member and/or bed partner may first notice the signs of sleep apnea.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This most often means that the airway has collapsed or is blocked during sleep. The blockage may cause shallow breathing or breathing pauses.

When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage can cause loud snoring. Obstructive sleep apnea happens more often in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone.

Central sleep apnea is a less common type of sleep apnea. It happens when the area of your brain that controls your breathing doesn't send the correct signals to your breathing muscles. You make no effort to breathe for brief periods.

Central sleep apnea often occurs with obstructive sleep apnea, but it can occur alone. Snoring doesn't typically happen with central sleep apnea.

Outlook

Untreated sleep apnea can:

  • Increase the risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, obesity, and diabetes
  • Increase the risk for or worsen heart failure
  • Make irregular heartbeats more likely
  • Increase the chance of having work-related or driving accidents

Lifestyle changes, mouthpieces, surgery, and/or breathing devices can successfully treat sleep apnea in many people.